Archive for It's About The Horse The Free Forum for those Doing Parelli - and a whole lot More! "Anything forced and misunderstood can never be beautiful." Xenophon (430-355 B.C.),
 


       It's About The Horse Forum Index -> Horse General Chat
TakinabreakFromtheVirtual

This mule knows his/her job

Someone posted this on SC...it caught my attention.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8SEP_GJKlL0&feature=related

What do you think?
thelmanelle

Not sure.  Is that fair?
Copious_Amour

Wtf is happening to that poor calf? I wouldn't finish watching. Straight animal abuse. Disgusting.

Edited to add: Anyone who is sensitive to animal abuse should not watch this video. I wish I would have been warned ahead of time.
dmcamelothills

I'm just going to quote one comment on you tube  "What the hell are you doing???"  
PasoBaby_CarolU

I don't think any of you understand that video at all.  That wasn't one calf but several, and none were killed that I saw.  That was a video of clips to show the working mule.

Each spring when cows calve the calves all have to be doctored, get their shots, bull calves cut, usually an earmark or dewlap cut to identify the calf as that farmer's.  If they are a horned breed they are dehorned then also.  Here in the west we brand the calf too.  This is all NORMAL ranch work.

During this time the cows are very protective of their calves.  They will kill a dog and often injure the farmer/rancher doing this.  This mule does indeed know her job.  She was keeping the cow from injuring the rancher while he doctored the calf.  

Modern ranches here usually use squeeze chutes, but what happens to the calves is the same.  I've seen very protective cows climb over big fences to protect their calf and I've had to go to an ER because of a cow, and have taken others to the ER.   It is very dangerous.

You all want to know what a working cow horse does...this is it.  This is what Buck and Ray and all of them DO.  They rope the calves and then ranch hands doctor them.  This is the whole purpose of roping.
learningthedance

I was pretty impressed with how that Mule kept Moma at a safe distance, but guarded that baby (and farmer). Amazing how it would look at the calf tentatively with ears forward but knew exactly what to do with mom. Amazing! Yes, I felt bad for the calf too, but was just so taken with how this Mule worked. She/he(?) would surely put a few working dogs and cowboys out of work and all done at liberty. Would have been nice if they at lease showed them release the babies to go back to their waiting mom's. I really wanted to see what the Mule did and how she knew the "job" was done. VERY cool!! Now THAT is what I call a solid partnership. She sure did love her job and was certainly protecting her owner while he got the job done.

We have a Mini Mule "Beauford" and he will put the run on the neighbors dogs if they come in the pasture. He is extremely protective of his heard even though he isn't at the top of the pecking order. He takes his job very seriously, but I have never seen anything like this.
coveredbridgefarm

There have been times when I could have used a mule like that.

Larry
TakinabreakFromtheVirtual

OH sorry...I guess I should have explained the video more.   Didn't mean to upset anyone.

Thanks for explaining Carol.   This rancher I believe is in Mexico and maybe a small operation, can't afford al the bells and whistles of a large operation(like the chutes carol describes above) so he uses his mule for protection.    The Calves are ok.....in fact I would think this is less tramatic than seperating them and running them into a chute.  

Yep you go to a working cow clinc with Buck....you will see exactly this thing minus the mule.   The one I watched they branded, castrated and Dr'd the calves during the last day of the clinic.

I was impressed with the mule...working at liberty.   True test of a partnership.
dmcamelothills

Thank you for the explanation.  I wanted to believe this was cow working but the longer I watched it the less I got that.  I really needed the story behind the story.    

Now with the explanation, I get it and yes! the mule is amazing and impressive.   Previous comments retracted!!
ErinR76

LOL Cari. I was fixin' to say, man, any of y'all that thought that was abuse, I hope you don't eat beef!

(I actually wish I didn't eat beef and in my next life I'm going to be born an east indian)
dmcamelothills

ErinR76 wrote:
LOL Cari. I was fixin' to say, man, any of y'all that thought that was abuse, I hope you don't eat beef!

(I actually wish I didn't eat beef and in my next life I'm going to be born an east indian)


 I have no problem with cow working and herd management.   I just couldn't figure out if this was an exhibition of that...or not.
thelmanelle

Yes, thank you for the explanation.  Go Mule!
Copious_Amour

Yes, thanks for the explanation. My above comments are also retracted.
ErinR76

Isn't it crazy how it is really not about the physical universe, but our INTERPRETATION of it, that has all the power in the world? In both cases, it was the same event but two different viewpoints/perspectives that determined how we thought about what was going on? Amazing!
coveredbridgefarm

I have noticed that it happens a lot.  

Everyone has a perspective, right, wrong, or in between.  

Larry
PasoBaby_CarolU

BTW - if the video was upsetting, cattle work may not be for you.  They had beautiful music on this video.  The audio track would have been more disturbing then the visual tape, so be glad it wasn't included.  

When we had our ranch we would get teased about spraying an analgesic spray over brands and ear marks and we switched to Angus and Polled Herefords so we didn't have to dehorn after seeing how awful it was.  It really was disturbing, too upsetting for us.  If we still had the ranch I'm sure we would be freeze branding instead of hot branding.  

To be honest I think everyone should go experience a farm for awhile.  I think most people are too far removed from the earth and what it really means to be a predator.
learningthedance

PasoBaby_CarolU wrote:
 I think most people are too far removed from the earth and what it really means to be a predator.


Really? I think the opposite. Too many act like predators and are too far removed from the earth to even see it.

hmmmm, Now I have to go think on that one.
TakinabreakFromtheVirtual

scratch
Hertha

Some cool mule  

Boots treats poor old Smoky like that a lot of the time when she feels he's intruding on her bubble.
Copious_Amour

learningthedance wrote:
PasoBaby_CarolU wrote:
 I think most people are too far removed from the earth and what it really means to be a predator.


Really? I think the opposite. Too many act like predators and are too far removed from the earth to even see it.

hmmmm, Now I have to go think on that one.


That's the problem for me. Grew up in the country. Mostly all I know is country but from the age of 9 I became an animal activist so I walked the other way when the branding, roping, slaughtering etc would go on. I think we all act like we're top dog but I also think we are beyond removed. I think you're both right. In not going to ever take part in roping calves, I think it's stupid (for sport anyway, to get a herd one spot to the next then okay) and same on hot branding but I sure would love to ride a cutting horse once. (Course, I'm one who thinks the video of the horse kicking the guy in the face while he's in a stock and the guy is hot branding him is funny so I'm probably not one to ask.) The point is, I love getting down and dirty and living a ranch, but I'll never be a part of the abuse that goes down. Now that could even be interpreted differently. Heck, riding horses is abuse to some. *shrug*
coveredbridgefarm

learningthedance wrote:
PasoBaby_CarolU wrote:
 I think most people are too far removed from the earth and what it really means to be a predator.


Really? I think the opposite. Too many act like predators and are too far removed from the earth to even see it.

hmmmm, Now I have to go think on that one.
It's interesting to compare those two observations.

Since I have done exactly what that rancher was doing many times, I feel I can comment with at least some justification. In order to earn a living supplying the public's demand for beef, the rancher was vaccinating his calves against disease, castrating them, id'ing them, etc.. The very young calf had an instinctual urge to survive the attack from the predator(death struggle).  The cow had the natural parenting instinct to save her calf. The mule had the remarkable impulse to protect the human. Some folks who saw the film thought it was abusive and some of those people were no doubt meat eaters so they helped to supply the demand for meat?

Which of the two observations is best supported by that chain of events if you consider the meat eaters to be the real predators? Or are they equally supported? We are talking about different perspectives of the same event and how disconnected people can become. Wars begin this way.  

Quote:
I think most people are too far removed from the earth and what it really means to be a predator


Quote:
Really? I think the opposite. Too many act like predators and are too far removed from the earth to even see it.


Larry
PasoBaby_CarolU

Very good, thought provoking questions Larry.  I guess I should elaborate on my comment.   I think as a responsible predator you have to get to know your prey.  You have to touch it, feel its life blood, appreciate its sacrifice for you to eat.  I don't think you get that at the meat counter at the grocery store or laid out nicely between hamburger buns.  

The distance from nature also makes people very unrealistic about what it takes to get that hamburger: the raising, care and feeding of livestock or poultry, and then the slaughter and meat packing of turning a live animal into a cook-able piece of meat.  We all get farther and farther from that.   I am still reminded of the Facebook comment I saw that hunting was cruel and barbaric, that people should just go to the store for their meat.      

The human race continues to make poor decisions because of their distance from the reality of being a responsible predator; digging up farmland to plant subdivisions, stopping hunting and letting deer herds over-populate until they are starving, even the arguments to turn the open range lands over to wild horses, are all examples of distancing ourselves from the reality of living in an ecosystem.  Over populating and over fishing.  The list is endless.  

How few people could really be self-sufficient today?  The skills to 'live off the grid' are rapidly being lost.
Pedestal*Pony

Awesome mule!  He even pulled the bridle a couple times for it to be more comfortable in not having to drag or get caught up in the rope or reins.  

I believe those are Brauma cows?  If they are, those are mean cows.  

I would love to have a mule like that.  
TakinabreakFromtheVirtual

PasoBaby_CarolU wrote:

The human race continues to make poor decisions because of their distance from the reality of being a responsible predator; digging up farmland to plant subdivisions, stopping hunting and letting deer herds over-populate until they are starving, even the arguments to turn the open range lands over to wild horses, are all examples of distancing ourselves from the reality of living in an ecosystem.  Over populating and over fishing.  The list is endless.  

How few people could really be self-sufficient today?  The skills to 'live off the grid' are rapidly being lost.


I for one am perpared to live should the "grid" fail.......  That would be a great topic for another thread...     I wonder, anybody else think and perpare about this?
learningthedance

becdubie wrote:
PasoBaby_CarolU wrote:

The human race continues to make poor decisions because of their distance from the reality of being a responsible predator; digging up farmland to plant subdivisions, stopping hunting and letting deer herds over-populate until they are starving, even the arguments to turn the open range lands over to wild horses, are all examples of distancing ourselves from the reality of living in an ecosystem.  Over populating and over fishing.  The list is endless.  

How few people could really be self-sufficient today?  The skills to 'live off the grid' are rapidly being lost.


I for one am perpared to live should the "grid" fail.......  That would be a great topic for another thread...     I wonder, anybody else think and perpare about this?


This is exactly where I am headed. My "bucket" list has only one thing on it, and THAT is it. The rest of the bucket list will evolve when the first one is here to build on.
thelmanelle

Becky,
You are wise.  I do think to be able to live off the grid is a smart thing.  More folks are losing their jobs and less can hire.  A painter had a 22 year old walk up to him just the other day out of the woods.  The girl friend dropped him off so he could scout and break in.  
The painter was told by him that his car "broke  down"  and he would love some water and to use the phone for help.  

Mean while, a helicopter was flying over head searching for this guy as they discovered his side kick girl friend.  They had quite a scam and plans to do harm.  So being ready to live off the grid means ready for more than your water supply and food.  People will seek you out.  

The mule is a smart mule and very well trained in guarding his owner once you realize his job.  He does it very well for the rancher/farmer.
Hertha

Read not long ago that the chap who started Facebook, or was it the guy who's been putting 'secret' political papers on a website, one of them, anyway, who has decided to eat only meat he kills himself.  

I think he had eaten rabbit and chicken and was preparing himself to eat a sheep.

Very sobering thought.  Guinea pigs make good eating.  When I worked as a zookeeper I had to kill large numbers of rats, mice, chicks, guinea pigs (and cut off the ear tags from those that came from labs) to feed the predators in my care.
thebundychick

Hertha, I read the same thing, And kudos to him!

People are so detached!

There was a biiiig news story that broke here a few months ago, about Australia's live export market, how we export our cattle to indonesia, and they generally torture them to death.

Its massive. Its still ongoing. It caused me to become a vegetarian.

Not because i don't agree with eating meat, but simply because i will not support an industry or government that simply by its inactivity in this matter, basically condones the senseless torture of these animals before their death.

We are a far cry from the American Indians, and the Aboriginals who actually gave thanks to the animal for its sacrifice before they killed it.
thelmanelle

I get amazed at people who get upset with the farmer and then, say things like I buy my meat from the grocery store...duh!  and you think that comes from where?  

The same with veggies.  Things are not off the truck.  They are grown on land, in gardens, on farms, in pastures, etc.  

Sometimes, I think the field trip to the working farm might be a good idea, like we use to do.  Actually see people do work.  See how food is really grown.  Pumpkins are not just at the roadside stand. The farmer planted them in the early Spring and now, we have pumpkins in the Fall.  

A farmer down the road has a mule to protect his cattle from neighbors dogs.  One of our neighbor's does not feed his dogs well and they wander and well, we have to protect.
PasoBaby_CarolU

Sonya, a big thing here now is for many schools to do a vegetable garden.  It's a great education for the kids.  Right now they are eating the fruits of their labor over the summer.   A lot of the kids are in awe that they could grow 'real' food.
thelmanelle

I like that and I wish that they would do it here.  Only farm kids know that stuff and other people who are teaching themselves.  We have lazy folks here who want to sit at the TV because it is hot and flip channels.  They do not want to work or grow a garden.  It's amazing.  The prices in the stores are such that I do not understand why they won't try to grow something and learn.  

I had to learn from my own mistakes.  I am on my 3rd fall garden.  Things are doing great.  I seem to have issues with carrots and cabbage...thank you dogs.
thebundychick

We've never had much luck with Carrots, don't think we've ever tried to grow cabbage

But we do grow with great success, pumpkins, tomatoes, capsicum, zucchini, cucumber, figs, pawpaw, lettuce, spinach, corn. I think thats it?

Lots of fun. And now that I collect the horses manure, we will *never* run out of fertilizer :D
ErinR76

Ooooh a gardening thread! I need help! I've been trying to grow in a raised bed for three seasons and I am not getting good results at all! Feel free to pm me your tips, heck, send the 'gardening for dummies' description for fertilizing, etc! My carrots barely even form a carrot and are less than pencil thin. My brocolli is weedy looking and barely forms heads. My lettuce doesn't grow heads, its really pathetic. I don't know what I'm doing wrong. I made my own compost and used lady bug brand organic fertilizer, had sun and plenty of water (but not too much). I got one tomato that looked pretty sorry on my two tomato plants this summer. Course its Texas and the heat is ridiculous. I can grow me a mess of jalapenos though.

I am one of those that longs to be totally self sufficient. I have a rain barrel, try to buy as much as I can from local farmers (meat included). There is a great book called Possum Living and it has all kinds of ideas for living for less than $20/month. Solar ovens, solar water heaters, wind turbines...? Sign me up. I like Mother Earth News magazine.
CoolsLadyInRed

We use raised beds with dirt and rotted horse manure.  Nothing did real well this year. I got no broccoli and few beans. My lettuce never even came up! It was an unusually wet spring. tomatoes weren't too gosh awful. Had some strawberries and the herbs did well. My garlic did poorly too this year. but raised beds do help with the weed issue. Tons of caterpillars eating everything this year!!!! I have never ever seen so many of 'em everywhere.  I love raising my own stuff and freezing it. BUT...this has been an exceptionally bad year for most everything.
thelmanelle

Carol would probably love for us to do a gardening thread.  
Some of this posts could be moved to it by her most likely.

I had good luck with lettuce, rutabagas, blueberries, grapes (muscadine), tomatoes, watermelon, red and sweet potatoes, bell peppers, cantaloupe, kalirobie(? sp) and weeds!  LOL!

I had bad luck cucumbers, radishes, carrots and help....and dogs who would eat my watermelons and tomatoes.  The deer got my cucumbers.  

The birds got some of the grapes and blueberries due to the drought.  I did try to leave water for the birds along with seed.  But,, the drought and nutritional needs made the blueberries and good source for nutrition and juice for the birds.  Cardinals will attack you while picking blueberries.

I have a compose from my kitchen that I dump in my compose barrel by the garden and turn every two days plus add some water for moisture.
Lots of grubs in the compose to keep the soil aerated.

The dogs love the dirt to dig in, so I have to protect some plants with tomato cages.  I do not have a fence around my garden.  Hubby does not want one.  So I have to deal with the elements.  The corn got ruined in a hail storm in one short storm.  It was a week from being harvested.

You can get a woman to help you more with a garden and farm than a man.  Everything from planting , weeding to canning and freezing. Since, I did not have anyone until late in the season after things were bountiful.  I donated most of my garden this year.  Hopefully next year , if I have the same help, we can get things done.
TakinabreakFromtheVirtual

I can grow beets and potatoes.......LOL!   I Would love to read how you all get a good crop of veggies.    Controlling the grasshoppers has been the issue around here.
PasoBaby_CarolU

Perhaps we should start a new thread on gardening in the General section and let this one get back on topic....
thelmanelle

Done, back to the mule and his job.  
PasoBaby_CarolU

Thanks lady!!!

One thing to notice is that the mule never hurts a calf, always knows the difference.  This is also a mark of a good cow horse.  My horse Tina would BITE a slow cow or large calf at the back of the herd if they weren't impressed with her ear-back "I'm going to kill you" look and dawdled along.  But the little calves she'd push gently with her nose to hurry them up.   It was pretty amazing to watch.   She was an awesome cow-horse and you had to 'ride' her the whole time she was working cows, because she'd go back after a turning back cow, weather you were on her or NOT!  LOL
thelmanelle

Your are welcome, lady!
Yes, he protected the farmer/rancher and the calf and he never hurt the momma...just kept her away while the fellow did his job.
bit

At the Buck clinic a couple of weeks ago, he noticed one of the calves they were working with was sick.  It went from learning to cut cattle to, get back we need to help this cow.  All business, only Buck and Kip were allowed to swing a rope, and it was done fast, with as little stress as possible to the animal.  It was a beautiful thing to watch.

The rancher and his guys ran in, gave the cow a shot, and he was released.  I could see how it would be pretty dangerous for everyone.  One little girl was upset, and I could hear her mom saying, "they are trying to help him".
TakinabreakFromtheVirtual

Great shot there Deb.
It's true...cattle are many...100's...when it comes time to vaccinate or Dr.  they are generally not halter broke and desensitized to vet and needles like our horses.     This is how it's done.
       It's About The Horse Forum Index -> Horse General Chat
Page 1 of 1
Home
|
Home
|
Home